Mona Vătămanu & Florin Tudor

Terms and Conditions

Working with a group of teenagers, the artists together with the playwright Mihai Lukács, in a workshop held at the Youth House, explored the relationship between social networks, data collection, and surveillance technologies. In consenting to the terms and conditions of any digital service, what are the implications concerning individual sovereignty?

The starting point of the work is an excerpt from Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism, published in 1951. Arendt describes a simple graphic system employed by the Czarist secret police, The Okrana Guard (operating between 1881-1917), in order to produce a social mapping of an individual by studying close relationships, contacts, and interactions. A density of information results from this cartographic representation of social interactions. Only technical limitations, suggests Arendt, restricted this endeavor from being applied on a larger scale and fulfilling the dream of a totalitarian police. In the current digital era, Arendt’s anticipation of an extensive social mapping as a tool for control reads like a prophecy.

Passages from Arendt’s text were pasted as vinyl stickers on four large canvases, with the sentences being peeled off letter by letter during the workshop. Although the text was removed, it left permanent and visible traces. Around and across the text, circles drawn by the artists and the teenagers evoke the surveillance system described by Arendt and point out the shared principles of perceptive between the language of abstraction in art and data visualization. Placed in the rotunda hall of the Youth House, the textiles become part of its architecture. The communal reading of an excerpt from an internet agreement repeats throughout the space in a loop. The voices of young performers overlap in a choir treating the click-to-agree terms the same way they are  written—close to unintelligible for each one of us.

 

 

Mona Vătămanu (b. 1968, Constanţa) & Florin Tudor (b. 1974, Geneva) work in Bucharest. Their practice consists of active observation and note taking of the material elements of reality. They often select that which is ephemeral, small, as marginal as dust, rust, fire, fluff, from the tree’s seeds, soil. The work of the artists in such material can be a starting point for questioning social relations, technological and economic changes, or political conflicts. Selected exhibitions: Metalurgica, Magma Contemporary Art Space, Sfântu Gheorghe (2019, solo); Borderlines, Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh (2019); Pangea United, ms Muzeum Sztuki, Lodz (2019); The Street. Where the World Is Made, Maxxi Museo Nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo, Roma (2018); GaudiopolisAttempts at a Joyful Society, GfZK Galerie fur Zeitgenossische Kunst Leipzig (2018); A Global Table, Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem (2017);and Everything we see could also be otherwise (My sweet little lamb), The Showroom, London (2017); Prăpădenia pământului, Salonul de proiecte, Bucharest (2016, solo); All that is Solid Melts into air, Extracity Kunsthal, Antwerp (2013, solo); I dreamt the work of another artist, Kunsthalle Lisbon (2013, solo); Powerlessness a Situation. Revolutie, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt (2012, solo); The order of things, daadgalerie, Berlin (2012, solo); All Power to the Imagination!, Secession, Vienna (2009, solo); and Surplus Value, BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht (2009, solo).